Celebrating the Spring Holidays

Learn English Phrases: 10 Things You’ll Hear on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday

Learn English Phrases: 10 Things You’ll Hear on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday


– Hello, this is Jack from to fluency.com and in this English lesson, I’m going to go over 10 phrases, or 10 things that you’ll likely hear on Thanksgiving Day and on Black Friday. Thanksgiving is one of the
most important holidays here in America, and it is celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November. It’s a holiday that you do your best to spend time with family,
you have a nice dinner and everything is peaceful. Black Friday, on the other hand, is all about shopping. And this is when, most
stores or all stores, offer discounts and
deals on certain items. And people go out, and
try to find the best deal on whatever they want to get. If you want to learn more about this holiday and Black Friday, I’ll leave a link to
wikipedia in the description, but let’s look at phrase number one. (music) Imagine that you’re in the kitchen and somebody takes the
turkey out of the oven. You can say, that looks delicious. That looks delicious. What you’re doing is using the word ‘look’ to describe appearance. You could also say, that looks amazing, that looks awesome. We can talk about people’s appearance too, using this verb. For example, she looks tired. He looks happy. She looks like Katy Perry. He looks like George Clooney. Going back to food, let’s
say the brussel sprouts come out and they’re black, because somebody left
them in the oven too long. You can say, they don’t look very good. The second thing you’ll probably
hear on Thanksgiving Day is what time does the game start? What time does the game start? We’re talking about
American football here, because there is always a
game on Thanksgiving Day. I don’t know too much
about American football, but I know this is
important on Thanksgiving. But do you notice, the
way I ask this question. What time does the game start? Now, which tense is that? It is, the present simple,
because we use the present simple to talk about events in the future, something that is on a schedule. Again, I’ve made a lesson on this. I’ll leave a link in the description. But you can ask the question,
what time does the game start? Another question you might
ask on Thanksgiving Day is, how long will this take? How long will this take? We’re talking about food again and what we’re asking is, how long will this take to cook? So let’s say you have a turkey. You know it should go in
at a certain temperature. I don’t know what that is. But, you know the temperature, but you don’t know how long
it’s going to take to cook. So you ask your friends,
your family member, how long is this going to take to cook? We can use ‘will’ or ‘going to’ here. How long will this take? How long is this going to take? Another example of using the
verb ‘take’ in this case is, it takes me 10 minutes to get to work. It takes me 10 minutes to get to work. Okay, now the turkey is in the oven, But, you didn’t set a timer. You didn’t set a timer. And, you take the turkey out. It doesn’t look very good. And you say, oh no, I left
the turkey in too long. I left the turkey in too long. We use this phrase of verb, ‘leave in’ for many different things. For example, don’t leave
that bottle of beer in the freezer too long. Don’t leave that bottle of
beer in the freezer too long. Otherwise, it might explode. Another example is, uggh,
I left my keys in the car. I left my keys in the car. Even though we left the
turkey in the oven too long, it’s still edible. But before we eat it, somebody usually asks the question, what are you thankful for? What are you thankful for? And this is a big part of Thanksgiving. It’s to give thanks, to talk
about what you are grateful for And it doesn’t always
happen around the table, in a formal way, but usually
somebody talks about this. And I have been to
Thanksgiving dinners before where everybody said what
they were thankful for. It’s a good time to ask you a question, what are you thankful for? What are you thankful for? So after you have said
what you are thankful for, you are sitting down at the table, and you’re eating turkey,
but it’s a little bit dry because you left it in the oven too long. So you want more gravy, and the way to ask somebody
for the gravy is this, could you pass me the gravy please? Could you pass me the gravy, please? Sometimes, people don’t
say please at the end, but they do say, thank you, once somebody passes the gravy to them. We can also exchange ‘could’
for ‘can’ and say this, can you pass me the gravy, please? I ask this question a lot, because I love gravy. (music) Okay, so you have your dinner. You have eaten too much. You go to bed. And then the next day is Black Friday. What you might hear is this, Have you seen the line at Walmart? Or have you seen the line at Best Buy? Walmart and Best Buy
are both popular shops to go to on Black Friday, because usually they have a lot of deals. And by asking that question,
have you seen the line at Best Buy, what you’re saying is, there are so many people
lining up to get into Best Buy. In British English, we’ll
use the word queue here. Have you seen the queue at Best Buy? Or, there are a lot of people queuing up. And I’m sure you’ve seen
one of those videos where, a shop opens its doors on Black Friday and people rush in to get the best deals. Speaking of getting best deals, I’ve mentioned this a couple of times, and you’ll hear people say,
I just got a great deal on, this new TV. I just got a great deal
on this new microwave. To get a good deal on something means that you get it for a good price. You get it on sale. And Americans will say,
I just got a great deal. British people say, I’ve
just got a great deal. I made a video on this difference which you can watch. There’s a link in the description. If somebody buys something
that they regret, they will say, oh, I
shouldn’t have bought that. I shouldn’t have bought that. Using ‘shouldn’t have’ in the past is a great way to express a regret. So what you’re saying is, I didn’t need that, I don’t want this now. I shouldn’t have bought that. There are many things
that I regret buying. And I use this all the time. I shouldn’t have bought that. But another example is this. Imagine that, you say something, that isn’t very nice. You can say, sorry, I
shouldn’t have said that. I shouldn’t have said that. For people who don’t want to line up who don’t want to go outside, what they tend to do, is, they do their shopping online. So you’ll hear them say, I’m doing all my shopping
online this year. I’m doing all my shopping
online this year. This has become more popular now. And there’s a day, which is Cyber Monday, that focuses on online deals. But you’ll find Black Friday also has lots of deals online too. So a lot of people prefer
to do their shopping online. The last one is this. Imagine that I see my wife on her computer, because she
does her shopping online. And she’s buying something else. And I ask her the question, what are you buying now? What are you buying now? By adding ‘now’, at the
end of the question, it suggests that my wife has
been buying a lot of things. And I’m surprised that
she’s buying something else, or maybe not surprised. So I ask her the question,
what are you buying now? My dad used to say
something similar to me, which was, what are you eating now? And this was usually on a Friday night, when I used to watch wrestling, and eat packets of crisps,
yogurt, cereal, so much stuff. And when I went into the
kitchen to get something else, he asked me the question,
what are you eating now? Okay, so we have covered
a lot in this lesson. And I have taught many of the phrases in different videos before. So, be sure to check out the description or click on your screen to watch one of these videos. If you have enjoyed this, then please like and share it. Thank you for being here. And I will speak to you soon. Bye-bye. (music) I love gravy.


Reader Comments

  1. I have studied alone for about 11 months and your videos help me a lot. Your English is clear, I understand very well. Thank you for to share

  2. Hi Jack from Barcelona. I thankful for many things, one of them is to know your videos which help me to improve my English. although I already know some things it's very useful to review .
    continue with that enthusiasm that characterizes you.

  3. Oooh Black Friday. Always exciting to see the highlights on YouTube or in the local news of how thousands of people rushed, fought, scrambled, attacked, and pushed each other in order to buy the last 40 inch TV that was on sale for 10% off. Thanks for the great video :o)

  4. Great video Jack these are very useful phrases for this time. Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays and I also love black Friday shopping! I hope everyone has a good holiday break!

  5. Thank you for watching, everyone. Good news! I am running a Black Friday Special until Tuesday. This is HUGE! Learn more here: https://www.tofluency.com/bfs

  6. Thanks for another awesome lesson , all the phrases you've mentioned are really functional . By the way , l've been watching the video with your wife recently , she's a real beauty .

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